REVIT vs. CAD

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REVIT vs. CAD

Postby Lee Chun Design Service » Wed Mar 18, 2009 5:45 am

Hello all,

How do you feel about REVIT?
Do you feel obligated or excited to use REVIT?
I like REVIT very much and believe that it's the future in AEC industry, though currently, most used software is still CAD.
There're hot discussions: http://www.myarchn.com/group/bim/forum/ ... opic:60855

Lee Chun Design Service
www.leechunds.com
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REVIT Modeling 01-b.JPG
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Postby Antisthenes » Wed Mar 18, 2009 11:34 am

why change what works only to be trapped by a corporation who has a long history of not listening to it's users concerns and serving solely it's stock holders? even if BIM has a future it will not be with autodesk there is just too many hard feelings and bad blood, i think. the more interoperability it gets maybe that changes but as of now the trend seems to be to break or thwart that kind of cooperative consensus that is being asked for in the name of profit and dominance(sic).

when Open Design Alliance and Solidworks win in court the vindication only begins.
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Postby Lee Chun Design Service » Thu Mar 19, 2009 4:01 am

As a company, Autodesk has to make profit for its share holders. Undeniably, Autodesk is keeping on developing the softwares for users to improve the efficiency and collabrations among disciplines.

ODA and other non-profit corporations have made great effort in setting the libraries to make CAD drawings more accessible for the users. Autodesk may lose some profit, but importantly the users get the convenience. It is good news that The suit was dropped between AUTOCAD and ODA. After all, ODA has increased competition in the market for CAD software.

Right now, Revit is one of the most widely used BIM softwares and keeps on occupying the market. Revit has good parametric modeling functions and user friendly work interface. If we are talking about the BIM's future, Revit will be one of the best candidates.
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Postby svenglezz-ASMEIL » Thu Mar 26, 2009 12:47 pm

I have tried Rivet spent 1 day on it....could not draw one pipe or duct, could not get past this hole setting/project/families etc. etc. etc. and in comparison I used google sketchup and was able to do full walkthroughs' in hours, so realy not the most user friendly product that's for sure.

In Rivet I did manage to figure out the titleblocks and mess around, but I can make a change in CAD to one titleblock and instantly changes on all drawings, with great flexibilities unlike the Rivet (not to mention building key plans etc. etc.)

After downloading the 30 day trial, I did get a call the very next day from Autodesk on the Rivet and what I think of it (next day....that's enough time to review a complex software), and asked some questions and I got someone will get back to you...still waiting lol.

I did watch and participate in the online video things on the web site, and saw MANY mistakes in the design aspects that most do not see, I even sent an email with no reply. Let me fix that....EVERY ONLINE VIDEO HAD MISTAKES.

I have a feeling that the "design" aspect of it is stepping OVER the line, they DO NOT provide "INSURANCE" if it's wronge, and you MUST check the work to ensure it's correct, thus YOU ARE NOT SAVING ANY TIME, in reality you are wasting more time doing the design twice.

Many people in this industry have there own systems/legends and blocks etc. some are VERY picky while some are not, so how does Rivet deal with this?

Anyway I have my own system that I have developed over 25 years, and have so many "blocks" it hurts :) and works with any blocks and/or legends etc.

My system is fully integrated accross the mech/elect. to ensure no mistakes due to co-ordination issues. etc. etc. works great for equipment, pump and fan tags etc.

Same goes for the arch. struct. etc. for updates of drawings we simple "drag-and-drop" and presto' updated drawings. Can begin making changes instanly, I can make changes and issue drawings in a day while others take weeks and some even months. Plus the system is so simple even the architects can work with the mechanical/electrical drawings :) Great for pipe spaces and wall boxes etc. etc. and even moving pipes to see the location below instanly, in short making co-orordination fun again.

With the mechanical side my system can walk circles around Rivet on speed, I can draw a duct or pipe or whatever and will show up automaticly below and/or above...oh with each floor in full 3D with a flip of a paper space and a fully 3D model of the entire building with automatic 3D risers for each discipline, and so simple.

And the 3D is all great an all, but how do you present it in Rivet? How do you print a building in 3D with all the pipes and ducts etc. Y'r gon'a need 1000 drawings to present all the 3D views :) Not to meniton seperating all the disciplines to figure out what is what in the 3D view.

I even took it to a service known as "ASMEIL" integrating all the drawings into one (arch/struct/mech/elec/interior/landscape). and present in a clear way....on more complex projects 2 plans are presented 1 for services below the ceiling and one above etc.

Once this ASMEIL'ing is done you can see if the project is co-ordinated/up-to-date and have this tool to ensure everyone gets on board and being up-to-date and/or co-ordinated.

I provide the "cover sheet" with a drawing chart, pen table etc. for FREE for eveyones use...cause no building should be without ASMEIL (can do at any stage of a project) Even at as-builts can be done with plotting reduced to 50% or more. Just send me an email and be more then happy to send the files.

Keep in mind this is is great work for intern/students etc. keeping them busy, while you work :)

Hopefully I did not rample on to much :), hope it helps.
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Postby Archie_tech » Thu Mar 26, 2009 6:43 pm

I think that with any software; you only really get to know it's 'ins and outs' through training and/or experience.

Revit is a very stable and user friendly software. If you follow my sig, you will be taken to our courses.

I hope this helps.
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Postby Lee Chun Design Service » Wed Apr 01, 2009 7:08 am

Sketchup and Revit are totally different softwares. Sketchup is easy for users to create models, however, it is not BIM at all.

To learn Revit, it needs much time, much effort and much pratice. We found it was not user friendly when we used it at the beginning, however, we feel it is very user friendly now through years. If you're creating a whole set of CD, it can definitely improve your efficiency dramatically!

Though Revit is far away from perfection, we can't wait for the perfect version launched. Have fun!
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Postby Bayern » Thu Apr 16, 2009 12:33 am

For sure Revit is much better than ACAD.

I have never worked with ACAD for more than 5 years since I met Revit in 2004.

Right now I can complete project with Revit from schematic design to construction documents... so far so good...

never go back to ACAD!
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Postby Bayern » Thu Apr 16, 2009 12:33 am

For sure Revit is much better than ACAD.

I have never worked with ACAD for more than 5 years since I met Revit in 2004.

Right now I can complete project with Revit from schematic design to construction documents... so far so good...

never go back to ACAD!
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Postby Lee Chun Design Service » Fri Apr 17, 2009 6:59 pm

Bayern, I agree with you. It is very tough in the initial stage and it even makes you want to quit, but once you learn 60% of Revit, you would be excited about it and never go back to other softwares.
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Postby svenglezz-ASMEIL » Thu May 21, 2009 10:05 am

So let me get this right...

Rivet is a BIM program with many problems/mistakes and people think is better then autocad?

First how can you compare them?

Second y'a better make sure your liability insurance is up to date :)
because the video's that autodesk presents on the web site, have many many mistakes. Thus you MUST check your design work "MANUALY" regardles of using BIM programs, so in the end you don't save any time.

Just wonder if the clients paying the fee for engineering relise what is happening, thus get a discount on the engineering fees due to the program doing it and not the engineer.

Another issue is maybe most people don't use autocad to it's full potential.

But for me to switch from using autocad to rivet not a chance. I have developed a system that is 100% integrated, fully co-ordinated, all services/risers etc. automatic throughout the building c/w 3D risers...while maintaining super friendly even for a novice drafter... and with drawings being issued in days, instead of weeks and even months.
Not to mention changes during a design.

So good luck to you y'r gon'a need it.
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Mentality of Denial

Postby az101010 » Mon May 25, 2009 10:54 pm

late last year the number of revit seats were
up to 350,000- by the end of 2009 there is
expected to be nearly 400,000 seats of revit..

how does one deny that? or pretend it don't
mean anything?

remember- drawing lines on the computer
screen (CAD) really only started working
fifteen years ago.. many still think it's no
better than hand drafting..

the whole thing was barely more than a
folly..

but the CAD monkeys kept insisting that it
will work- and it finally did start working
a little better than hand drafting- but it
has produced a mentality of denial
about the first REAL computers for
drafting- and it has cost society about
18 billion dollars a year in sloppy
computer lines..

i could empathize with the hand drafters
that did it that way for over 100 years-
but i just think these CAD monkeys
are a joke.. especially how they keep
paying autodesk to keep an old 1982
program alive.. and they refuse anything
new- they've got to have classic this and
classic that until the program is so
bloated it's dog..

they all think (what's left of them) that
they know what they are doing- but
they don't..
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Revitt just a baby

Postby archiform3d » Wed May 27, 2009 6:43 am

I think Revitt is really just a baby ArchiCAD - something Autodesk bought to compete. ArchiCAD always had the problem of "not being from Austodesk" or by having a different philosophy. Revitt came in much cheaper and had a "get a sale at any cost" attitude, even employing ex-ArchiCAD sales people to help it sell.

I hate to be negative, but I think Autodesk is far behind with AutoCAD and Revitt is still so immature. Congratulations for making a step forward but it's not a big enough step forward - it's like a Microsoft copy of something Mac.
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Postby John Cruet » Wed May 27, 2009 5:31 pm

Before making the decision to go to Revit, you might want to try VectorWorks. It has a very complete set of tools, and each virtual model can be loaded with all sorts of object data. It is clearly an alternative solution in the BIM arena.

My initial impression of Revit is that it is promising, but the tutorial I worked on had a fatal flaw which I could not work around.

Perhaps if I spent thousands of dollars of my very hard earned money taking a training course, I could "master" Revit. Having used VectorWorks, and having developed very detailed 3D renderings utilizing it, and complete design solutions, I personally feel there is no reason for me to try anything else right now.

Besides, VectorWorks runs on my Mac, which is a platform that is far less likely to crash, freeze, or catch malware.
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Revit training

Postby az101010 » Wed Jun 03, 2009 3:17 am

you don't gotta spent thousands of dollars on
a revit training course..

i'll admit i only know 3/4 of it after three years-
and it's not as easy to learn as a CAD drawing
program- but there is no point in making up
stuff about how much better the old unix OS's
are than windows or how much better the old
archicad is than revit- because you know it's
not true..

once you realize that revit will be the
industry standard just like autoCAD was- THEN
you will learn it much easier and faster..

i got on it three years ago because i KNEW this
would happen..

but it's still going to be several years.. the beginning
of this is really just now starting..

and revit 2010 has a completely new foundation..

right about now is when mainstream is expected
to begin learning revit and other BIM applications..

so just download the trial version and dig in..
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Re: Revit training

Postby John Cruet » Wed Jun 03, 2009 4:12 pm

az101010 wrote:you don't gotta spent thousands of dollars on
a revit training course..

.


OK, so my local AIA chapter is offering a Revit course for $US675. It's a 2 day course. That's not quite the thousands I claimed, but it's still steep.

Regarding your attack on Mac, I can only laugh at your ignorance about the platform. I run both platforms and I have to admit, I spend a lot of time cleaning up garbage that infiltrates my Windows machine. I don;t spend nearly a fraction of that time maintaining my Apple OS.
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