ADA, adaptability in residential project- NYC

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ADA, adaptability in residential project- NYC

Postby orlilan » Thu May 01, 2008 7:03 am

Hi.

I have come across a "handicap detail sheet" of a project which has excerpts from the ADA design guidelines but also other excerpts, the source of which I am trying to figure out.

These other excerpts are identical in font, graphics language and any other way to the ADA document (the online ADA design guidelines are identical to the print copies us architects have in our offices). But, they describe adaptable designs including bathrooms and kitchens (including, for example, shaded patches on bathroom interior elevations where wall reinforcement is required for future grab bars)

The ADA design guidelines does not describe adaptable design (they only define it), but only accessible design.

My question is, where did these excerpts come from. I need to clip them into drawings for my own residential project.

Thanks very much.
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Postby phansford » Thu May 01, 2008 1:33 pm

Single residential units in multi-family housing are governed by FHAG (Fair Housing Accessible Guidelines).

The Fair Housing Act is implemented and governed by HUD.

The website for HUD and Fair Housing laws is
http://www.hud.gov/offices/fheo/FHLaws/index.cfm

An on-line design manual can be found at
http://www.huduser.org/publications/des ... using.html

The federal register document has been put on line at
http://www.hud.gov/offices/fheo/disabil ... hefhag.cfm

If you have real questions contact Cheryl Kent at Fair Housing. I talked to her years ago and she was very helpful. Her phone number is on one of the pages I linked.
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Postby mx2 » Wed May 14, 2008 9:49 pm

I had forgotten about this resource,...thanks Phansford. I just dawned on me how little multi-family residential projects I have worked on. One, actually...


...but ADA accessibility is not necessarily something limited to mandated public minimums, so this is a valuable tool that could be applicable in a variety of other private building typologies as well.

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Postby nanrehvasconez » Thu May 29, 2008 11:59 pm

Your own residential project? if is a single family home for your own use you do not have to comply with ADA, it is better to let the handicaped buyer do his/her own ADA's application to fit his/her particular needs. we do multiple dwellings and hotel projects, in which we allow all the units and or guest rooms to be ADA accessible, for us is much cheeper to fit ADA requirements during construction than to do after compleation. Most cities and counties may require a small percentage of units to be ADA accessible.
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Postby phansford » Fri May 30, 2008 8:26 am

nanrehvasconez wrote:we do multiple dwellings and hotel projects, in which we allow all the units and or guest rooms to be ADA accessible, for us is much cheeper to fit ADA requirements during construction than to do after compleation.


Don't confuse Fair Housing (FHAG), which requires "adaptiblity" and Americans with Disabilities (ADAAG) which requires "accessibility". Multi-family housing is regulated by FHAG and commerical establishments providing goods and services (hotels) are regulated by ADAAG.

You can actually have a multi-family complex where both regulations are required. The individual units would be required to met FHAG, while the common public areas such as the management office and community building would be required to comply with ADAAG.

It is not a good idea to make every unit accessible as not every one with a disability can use the designs dictated by ADAAG. The ADAAG standards are based on a 28 year old male paraplegic with strong upperbody strength. So you could actually be creating a situation where someone with a disability can not be accommodated.

nanrehvasconez wrote:Most cities and counties may require a small percentage of units to be ADA accessible.


Cities and Counties do not have any say on the number of units that are required to be accessible. The percentages are clearly identified by ADAAG and FHAG. The ADA is a civil rights law with a building design component. The model building codes reference the guidelines (ICC Chapter 11). However, if you somehow get past the building inspector - which can easily happen, then enforcement is not by the building department or the fire department. Enforcement is by the Department of Justice as - again - the ADA is a civil rights law and is modeled and references the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
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Postby mx2 » Sat May 31, 2008 12:48 pm

Phansford is correct and this cannot be stressed enough. This is a Federal law mandated throughtout the entire country that is enforced by the Department of Justice (the Attorney General's office) as described in Title II and III. Here's a good link to answer any questions:

http://ada.gov/

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Postby nanrehvasconez » Sat Jul 19, 2008 8:11 pm

The republics of Berkley, Santa Monica and 1000 Oaks, among others, have more restrictive conditions than the Feds, in multiple housing and hotels, as long as you do not use federal funds (HUD) you may apply the lesser standards.
The reason we make our multiple dwellings all ADA complient is due to mangement expediency, if you have all ADA compliant, any unit can be rented to anyone
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Postby yoshiny » Tue Jan 13, 2009 11:27 pm

Thanks for the good info Phansford. New York City Hotel projects are regulated by ADAAG. We should also focus more on handicap accessibility in New York City Transportation.
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Postby abutan » Thu Jan 22, 2009 4:26 am

I mainly only deal with hotels and I know that those newly constructed
New York Hotel projects are really trying to follow the guidelines closely.
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Postby mickey1 » Fri Jan 23, 2009 3:38 am

The ADA design guidelines for New York City residential projects can be complicated and confusing, but with Phansford's resources it is helpful. Thanks!
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Postby olgat » Tue Feb 24, 2009 9:43 am

I have elder parents who still love to travel, so I do agree with Yoshiny regarding better handicap facility on public transportation, for example, improving New York City Bus Tour transportation. Most of the major Hotel New York have pretty efficient facility.
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