Looking 4 Geothermal Heating / AC System Contractor-LA, CA

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Looking 4 Geothermal Heating / AC System Contractor-LA, CA

Postby rentwest » Mon May 28, 2007 6:40 pm

We are developing two Malibu condominiums and looking for contractor (s) to design/build a geothermal heating and air conditioning system. Is there anyone out there to assist in this project. We would like to find a person who has designed and build residential geothermal systems in Southern California but can't seem to find one. We are hoping this forum can help.

Thank you
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Geothermal in Los Angeles

Postby fishbulb » Sat Mar 29, 2008 2:11 pm

Were you able to find a geothermal contractor in the area for your Malibu projects? I am looking for one for a house in the South Bay.
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Postby rentwest » Sun Mar 30, 2008 11:13 am

Surprisingly no not yet. Our project stalled a bid due to a permitting delay but still looking. If you like you can keep in touch at rentwest@gmail and if we find someone I'll pass it on.
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Postby fishbulb » Sun Mar 30, 2008 10:44 pm

Thank you. And, I will do the same.
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Postby rentwest » Mon May 12, 2008 2:16 pm

Fishbulb - did you ever find anyone to design/build a geothermal heating and air system? We can't believe how hard it is. Thanks
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Postby nanrehvasconez » Wed Jan 07, 2009 3:51 am

I have worked in Malibu and Ventura County, and in the great Los Angeles metro area, there is not hot springs that I know. Conasult with a local Geologist.

You may find designers and contractors for Geo-Thermal systems in Palm Springs, Palm Desert, Agua Caliente, Desert Hot Springs, and for sure in Mammouth Lakes.

Perhaps you ment HYDROTHERMAL systems, which are common in radiant floor and ceiling heating and cooling applications, I have used in Seattle and Atlanta projects.
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Postby simonsdad » Tue Jan 13, 2009 6:52 pm

There is confusion here. There is geothermal energy which is harnessing steam to generate electricity. That is not the application people are discussing here. It is geothermal earth-heat exchange which is basically a heat pump/dump which harnesses the earth constant temperature to heat and cool buildings without a chiller or boiler. It requires drilling and looping... vertical or horizontal, but horizontal will require more real estate. You will require a driller, looper, and manifold. They are amazing systems and very simple to operate once installed. Many schools are using them. I do not check this board much but anyone can contact me at gbconsultores01 at yahoo.
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Postby nanrehvasconez » Wed Jan 14, 2009 11:04 am

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EERE Information Center
Printable Version
Geothermal Heat Pumps

Two 36-ton geothermal heat pumps used at the College of Southern Idaho.
The geothermal heat pump, also known as the ground source heat pump, is a highly efficient renewable energy technology that is gaining wide acceptance for both residential and commercial buildings. Geothermal heat pumps are used for space heating and cooling, as well as water heating. Its great advantage is that it works by concentrating naturally existing heat, rather than by producing heat through combustion of fossil fuels.

The technology relies on the fact that the Earth (beneath the surface) remains at a relatively constant temperature throughout the year, warmer than the air above it during the winter and cooler in the summer, very much like a cave. The geothermal heat pump takes advantage of this by transferring heat stored in the Earth or in ground water into a building during the winter, and transferring it out of the building and back into the ground during the summer. The ground, in other words, acts as a heat source in winter and a heat sink in summer.

The system includes three principal components:

Geothermal earth connection subsystem
Geothermal heat pump subsystem
Geothermal heat distribution subsystem.
Earth Connection
Using the Earth as a heat source/sink, a series of pipes, commonly called a "loop," is buried in the ground near the building to be conditioned. The loop can be buried either vertically or horizontally. It circulates a fluid (water, or a mixture of water and antifreeze) that absorbs heat from, or relinquishes heat to, the surrounding soil, depending on whether the ambient air is colder or warmer than the soil.

Heat Pump Subsystem
For heating, a geothermal heat pump removes the heat from the fluid in the Earth connection, concentrates it, and then transfers it to the building. For cooling, the process is reversed.

Heat Distribution Subsystem
Conventional ductwork is generally used to distribute heated or cooled air from the geothermal heat pump throughout the building.

Residential Hot Water
In addition to space conditioning, geothermal heat pumps can be used to provide domestic hot water when the system is operating. Many residential systems are now equipped with desuperheaters that transfer excess heat from the geothermal heat pump's compressor to the house's hot water tank. A desuperheater provides no hot water during the spring and fall when the geothermal heat pump system is not operating; however, because the geothermal heat pump is so much more efficient than other means of water heating, manufacturers are beginning to offer "full demand" systems that use a separate heat exchanger to meet all of a household's hot water needs. These units cost-effectively provide hot water as quickly as any competing system.

Additional Information
For more specifics on geothermal heat pump systems, including types, benefits and selection and installation, visit these pages on the DOE Consumer's Guide Web site:

Types of Geothermal Heat Pump Systems
Benefits of Geothermal Heat Pump Systems
Selecting and Installing a Geothermal Heat Pump System
To lean more about geothermal heat pumps, visit the International Ground Source Heat Pump Association, where you can search for local IGSHPA Accredited Installers, Trainers, and Certified Designers using their Business Directory. Information is also available from the Geothermal Heat Pump Consortium, which can help you can find a knowledgeable contractor in your area by using their GeoExchange Industry Directory.

While primarily intended for the energy managers of Federal facilities, DOE's Federal Energy Management Program does have information on purchasing and installing geothermal heat pumps that would be of help to commercial building owners or contractors on their heat pump Web page.

Printable Version
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Postby nanrehvasconez » Wed Jan 14, 2009 11:13 am

RENTWEST

LET THE FINGERS DO THE WALKING, "HVAC CONTRACTORS LOS ANGELES AREA"
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