Wind resistant structures

For discussion of structural innovations ranging from 3D Honeycomb to genomic and self-generating formal systems. All welcome.

Wind resistant structures

Postby P.C. » Sat Sep 11, 2004 4:40 pm

Hi

It is true that continuing building the houses as they was alway's build make no difference, but that don't mean that you could not emagine somthing that would acturly work , --- architecture can develob there are acturly stronger and weaker houses brand new building methods could maby be made efficient ,when replacing 20 different materials with one only.
Forming structures could bring a more humble architecture, shaping structures to vaccum to ground, while strong winds is made into spagetti , must we designers realy not use science forming the spaces ?

Done easy and strong with 3D-HoneyComb ,here you shape the spaces, make the structure and framework fit whatever form ,sure you can break the winds but you shuldn't do it by fighting it.

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Hurricane - typhoon Wind resistance

Postby JWmHarmon » Tue Sep 14, 2004 12:48 am

Recent hurricanes in the Carribean and typhoons in Japan, China, and other Pacific Ocean areas SHOULD lead us to question if we should continue to build as we always have.

Why must almost all residential architecture be based on polyhedron models? Large flat surfaces create great obstacles to the wind loads. When we are talking about "Category 5" hurricanes with sustained wind speeds of 160 miles per hour (about 260 Km per hour) the forces that try to tear apart flat walls or lift roofs are enormous. Nature has a way of reminding us of our folly in placing such obstacles in the direct path of the eye of the storm.

Building codes that assume that we will always build rectilinear forms try to tie together parts that are barely capable of resisting such forces, if they can resist them at all.

Should we change building codes to require curvilinear forms for residences (and other buildings) that predictably will have to withstand such hurricane and typhoon forces?

Perhaps we should require all proposed structures to be tested in a wind tunnel to see what patterns of air flow would be best suited for buildings in hurricane and typhoon areas.

This could be Frank Gehry's greatest contribution to humanity. It would be interesting to see the results of wind tunnel tests on some of his creations.

Maybe we could build domes and other curvilinear structures to let the wind swirl around them instead of trying to push them over.

Maybe we should consider Per's suggestion that we should be exploring new construction methods and materials.

Question for Per: Have you done any water resistance studies of your boat building designs? Have you tried to apply the results of this data to other structures or buildings? Any experts out there in fluid dynamics?

One thing is certain: If we continue to do what we have always done, we will get the same results that we have always gotten.

Students looking for a research topic may be interested in doing wind tunnel research on different designs. (You might even check out or revisit R. Buckminster Fuller's wind tunnel research.)
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Postby P.C. » Tue Sep 14, 2004 7:24 am

Hi

I think there are many things to consider, first have a look about what is still satanding ,make a few decisions why and then try build from that.
I don't know if somthing like a "wind dike" ( sorry I don't know the right word ) , would even be possible. But breaking the wind around a small town ,making it turbulent by porpus , would maby be an option ,not leading it away but splitting it up making it force itself. ------ well this ask more wind tunnel experiments but making the building industrie turn with the efficient way's houses are made today, will proberly be an even harder task than forcing a gale.
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Postby P.C. » Tue Sep 14, 2004 4:16 pm

Hi

Sorry what I shuld have suggested, shuld ofcaurse be somthing stronger and better ,best somthing that suggest new jobs and a promise of nice new houses. Somthing like this ;

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concrete!

Postby Landy » Sat Apr 29, 2006 11:14 pm

The "rule of thumb" is to use REINFORCED CONCRETE if you don't want your house blown away by either freak hurricanes or tornados. Wood/steel Honeycomb construction technology makes the structure super rigid, however it will turn brittle and fail due to excessive stress. Sad, I know trust me use concrete if you are to design a project in a hurricane/typhoon sensitive area.
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Postby P.C. » Sun Apr 30, 2006 6:46 am

I understand that weight would be your first choice , that it will be sense to allow the buildings to be able to restand by sheer weight , and true concrete are a wonderfull material but, ------- I don't think most family houses that get rebuild will be made from concrete even it would be wise to do so.

With the Tsunami we seen that acturly the weakest parts of the structures made many of these survive ; when walls could be knocked down and the house was build in the right direction, so no great force could make dameage, you seen buildings where the bottom floor walls gave away and saved the rest of the structure. ------- Now "houses are as houses are" and I think this is the main problem, that not much thought except reinforcing the roof beams are the engineering that gone into it ; or how much is acturly learned ,will we design buildings with organic forms while that way the structure will protect itself instead of trying to fight a force it never can resist , ------ how will the new houses look they will be Exactly as the ones that was destroyed ---- I think There is the subject for speculation Why are the new houses Exactly as the old ones, why can't we get wiser.

There are several resons I guess, but it is a fact that not much are "learned" , maby the trouble is, that in fact there are not very many other options. --- that "this is how you build a house" , that building with concrete is more expensive or ask you to be a skilled handyman .

Now I used to have the option to "ballance" my replies ---- some of the 3D-H examples can be a bit if not a lot spetacular and loud "speaking" , but to stay on subject you know that I must say, that concrete is often reinforced that it most often ask reinforcement. Then what is better than knowing that your formwork allow for a very efficient and flexible outcome ; think about it, what would be better than having the forms for the concrete and these forms allow you to further reinforce with steel rods . You will need forms you will need to reinforce then guess what I will suggest for forms, guess how I will suggest a way to build the reinforcement ready for the concrete to be poured ,,,,,,,

Now this new fora is a positive and exiting option, a great idea and cirtainly one that is promped to be a succes , realy this is exactly what Designcommunity been waiting for .
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Check Out Insulated Concrete Form Construction!

Postby harveyjuric » Sun May 07, 2006 5:22 pm

Wind resistance is easily solved by building out of Insulated Concrete Forms: Check out the following sites: http://insulated-concrete.com and http://ontario-home-builder.com
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Postby dgt » Wed Aug 23, 2006 3:27 pm

Gehry's work is wind turbulance heaven.

One is not often thinking of aerodynamics when translating architecture from crumpled pieces of paper.

Saarinen's work is different though.

Regards,
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Postby Antedbasup » Wed Nov 15, 2006 4:10 am

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Postby Guest » Thu Nov 23, 2006 6:28 pm

Interesting point... anyone here thinks that some day houses could be built in a different way??? any ideas????
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wind resistance

Postby barryhunter » Fri Dec 14, 2007 6:35 am

The most wind resistant shapes are domes. Fiberglass as shown here http://www.strombergarchitectural.com/p ... etails.php
or concrete as provided by monolithic and others.
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